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Offline Yada  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, September 2, 2008 1:54:19 PM(UTC)
Yada
Joined: 6/28/2007(UTC)
Posts: 3,537

Quote:
`The Shack’ proves an unlikely success story
By Steve Rabey

"The Shack," a novel of horror and healing that was rejected by more than a dozen publishers, has sold more than 2 million copies to become the bestselling religion book of the past year.

Author William P. Young, who goes by Paul, says he wasn't writing for the masses but for a small circle of family and friends. But his story was so raw and powerful that it has touched thousands of readers and turned Young into a sudden, if unlikely, celebrity.

"I totally see this as a God thing," said Young, 53, in an interview. "This is proof that God still uses the foolish. And it shows that story always has a way of reaching the heart of a person in ways that a debate or lecture doesn't."

"The Shack" tells the story of Mackenzie Philips, who is enjoying a family vacation when the unthinkable happens: his daughter is abducted and murdered in a nearby shack. Four years later, the grieving father receives a letter from God inviting him to spend a weekend at the shack. Mack accepts, and his understanding of God (who appears as a black woman named Papa) and forgiveness are transformed and enlarged...

Read on
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Offline James  
#2 Posted : Sunday, October 19, 2008 11:10:39 AM(UTC)
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My wife is reading this book right now, from what she tells me of it there is a lot of good to it. It seems to stress relationship,and not following religious schemes. There have been a few things I have disagreed with, the unimportance of names for one, but I plan on reading it when she is done. It sounds like it might be a good start for many people who are not yet able to outright leave there comfort zones immediately, hopefully it will get some people thinking.
Don't take my word for it, Look it up.

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Offline CK  
#3 Posted : Sunday, October 19, 2008 12:40:56 PM(UTC)
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I plan to read it as well. A friend of mine (a Yahuah believer and a reader of YY) read it and thought it was interesting. My reading material is usually pretty heavy stuff, so I'm looking forward to taking a little break. :o)
Offline Theophilus  
#4 Posted : Friday, November 14, 2008 10:19:14 AM(UTC)
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Someone was telling me about this book and it sounds very intersting. I'll have to check it out.
Offline edStueart  
#5 Posted : Friday, November 14, 2008 11:04:43 AM(UTC)
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Joined: 10/29/2008(UTC)
Posts: 370
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James wrote:
there is a lot of good to it. It seems to stress relationship,and not following religious schemes.


Agreed.

It is not a text book, but it has some really valuable themes.

Here is what one reviewer had to say:
Quote:

"Overall, I had to conclude that Young has an inadequate and often-unbiblical understanding of the Trinity. While granting that the Trinity is a very difficult topic to understand and one that we cannot know fully, there are several indications that he often blurs the distinct persons of the Trinity along with their roles and their unique attributes. Combined with his novel but unsupported conjectures, this is a serious concern."


The reviewer wraps up with this paragraph:

Quote:
"Because of the sheer volume of error and because of the importance of the doctrines reinvented by the author, I would encourage Christians, and especially young Christians, to decline this invitation to meet with God in The Shack. It is not worth reading for the story and certainly not worth reading for the theology."


The book has been banned at Liberty University, so that, coupled with the "unbiblical understanding of the Trinity" makes it a "must read"!

Enjoy!
"You shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free."
But first, it will piss you off!
Offline kp  
#6 Posted : Saturday, January 10, 2009 12:41:24 PM(UTC)
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Okay, I just finished reading "The Shack." (One of my wife's friends sent it to her.) My reaction is that Young's depiction of God's character is right on the money, but his view of God's nature is totally wrong. This book might be of value to someone steeped in religious Christianity, who has bought into myths of legality and morality as a means to salvation. That is, it may serve to shake them up a bit, get 'em thinking. But Young is hung up on the errant doctrine of a Trinity. Although he tried his best not to, he presents the deity as three distinct entities, not as One. I'd imagine anybody who's read my stuff or Yada's would absolutely gag on his sappy depiction of God. It's wrong on so many levels, though the author clearly doesn't present this as doctrine, but rather as an allegory. Problem is, lot's of folks aren't sharp enough to catch the difference. One thing he gets absolutely right, however, is relationship over religion. Good job there.

Other problems: Young doesn't know quite what to do with sin. The book is about forgiveness, and as far as it goes, it does a fine job in pointing out our need to let go of our hatred, even if it's justified. But he deftly sidesteps the issue of accountability before God. It's as if (and I'm not sure Young believes this) he believes that God intends to force forgiveness on all sinners, whether they want it or not. And he comes to within an inch of declaring a doctrine of universal salvation---without actually crossing the line.

Young doesn't seem to know God's name, and that annoyed me. Maybe he's just afraid to say it, for fear of appearing "religious." He assigns names to all three of his manifestations in his "Trinity," but none of them are Yahweh (though he clearly knows what the name means). Maybe he thinks it's "ineffable." Basically, his treatment of God, while somewhat refreshing, borders on sacrilige---it's one thing to be familiar and comfortable with God; it's something else entirely to be flippant with Him/Her/It (which is kind of how he present's his deity).

In short, I would be very selective in who I'd recommend this book to. You guys on the forum could no doubt filter out his errors and get to the heart of what's good in the book, which is of value, I'd say. To someone mired in religious dogma, it might be a wake up call. But to a young, inexperienced believer, it might do more harm than good.

kp
Offline Juski  
#7 Posted : Saturday, January 10, 2009 11:52:56 PM(UTC)
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Joined: 7/6/2007(UTC)
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Location: Salford, UK

Interesting. Rob's mum has just given me this book to read. She keeps giving us books that she thinks are linked to what we believe in the hope that maybe we will see we are not so different to her and come back to the mainstream. Shame they usually are totally not what we think! I will read it with great interest now. Maybe it will open up some more conversation. :)
Offline edStueart  
#8 Posted : Sunday, January 11, 2009 10:06:31 AM(UTC)
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Joined: 10/29/2008(UTC)
Posts: 370
Location: Philadelphia

kp wrote:
My reaction is that Young's depiction of God's character is right on the money, but his view of God's nature is totally wrong.


[snip]

kp wrote:
Basically, his treatment of God, while somewhat refreshing, borders on sacrilige---it's one thing to be familiar and comfortable with God; it's something else entirely to be flippant with Him/Her/It (which is kind of how he present's his deity).


[snip]

kp wrote:
In short, I would be very selective in who I'd recommend this book to. You guys on the forum could no doubt filter out his errors and get to the heart of what's good in the book, which is of value, I'd say. To someone mired in religious dogma, it might be a wake up call.


Like Ken said, I read this book with my "filter on", and really enjoyed it.

I consider it a "short story" rather than a text book

Young would not suggest considering it a text book, but some of our Brothers and Sisters seem to think that we are not smart enough to know that.

I once read another book, got quite a bit of good insight into the Messiah's character, but did NOT come away thinking His name was Aslan.

Regarding the "flippant" attitude, a friend at work said it well: "He is my Father, not my buddy."
"You shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free."
But first, it will piss you off!
Offline Robskiwarrior  
#9 Posted : Sunday, January 11, 2009 1:01:56 PM(UTC)
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edStueart wrote:


I once read another book, got quite a bit of good insight into the Messiah's character, but did NOT come away thinking His name was Aslan


Its not!? all this time....
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Offline Bridget  
#10 Posted : Tuesday, January 13, 2009 3:41:33 AM(UTC)
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I just finished The Shack yesterday~

I think it's a little jewel of a book. I knew nothing about it when I got it..

I don't see where it could 'do harm' as Kp says. It was kind of like a little break from studying YY, etc.

I'd recommend it, even if it is a bit elementary. and so sad. I cried through the first 5 chapters, just about.
But, it's easy reading, so it goes fast.

That's my 2 cents. :)
Offline kp  
#11 Posted : Wednesday, January 14, 2009 4:10:40 AM(UTC)
kp
Joined: 6/28/2007(UTC)
Posts: 1,030
Location: Palmyra, VA

Bridget writes,
Quote:
I don't see where it could 'do harm' as Kp says.


That's because you're well grounded, and can easily see that it's an allegory. Somebody raised on pop-theology and political correctness may not be so astute. I dunno. Maybe the truth is easy enough to perceive, and I'm just being overprotective. But you've got to admit, Aslan at least had talking beavers, fauns, and satyrs to set the tone. :-)

kp
Offline Matthew  
#12 Posted : Wednesday, January 14, 2009 9:19:20 AM(UTC)
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While I haven't read The Shack I did Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code. It was an enjoyable read but I was glad in that I was grounded when I did read it, especially when he tried to give the meaning of God's Name. Here are two quotes from his book:

Quote:
“The Jewish tetragrammaton YHWH–the sacred name of God–is in fact derived from Jehovah, an androgynous physical union between the masculine Jah and the pre-Hebraic name for Eve, Havah.” (309)

Quote:
“Early Jews believed that the Holy of Holies in Solomon’s Temple housed not only God but also His powerful female equal, Shekinah. Men seeking spiritual wholeness came to the Temple to visit the priestess–or hierodules–with whom they made love and experienced the divine through physical union.” (309)

Unfortunately some people aren't well grounded enough to know the truth, in the end Dan's book does more to side with the humanists than promote anything to do with God.

Sorry, I wasn't trying to deviate from topic, that's not my intention, but this whole being "selective in who I'd recommend this book to" caught me eye.
Offline Robskiwarrior  
#13 Posted : Wednesday, January 14, 2009 1:44:01 PM(UTC)
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Ju read it, im going to read it now - Ju posted a nice post but the forums did their thing and she lost it...
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Offline Robskiwarrior  
#14 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 3:35:15 AM(UTC)
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Ok so I just finished reading it and here is what I thought:

Good Points:

There are some absolutely awesome nuggets in there, he really does well at showing things like the knowledge of Good and Evil, that ours is far removed from His and what we thing is good and evil isnt what He thinks is good and evil. I also like the way he has gotten his head around the whole "relationship not religion" idea. As far as the story goes its a really easy read and a good story. I like the way he related to god as "Papa" I also liked the use of Abba, it was nice to see that kind of relationship promoted.


Bad points:

Its Christianity. It promotes the idea that plague Christianity, firstly the trinity - I'm not as offended by it as I think others are, and I see that he is promoting the whole "I am one" thing - yet there is something really grating about it, I think its the amount of time he uses "we", and he should have stuck with "I". Also the fact that the "trinity" were so distinct in their forms.

The Law is thrown into the fray, as if its a soft blanket for Christians by giving something they are comfortable with "the law is destroyed / fulfilled /abolished". We don’t have to live that way anymore coz "Jesus" fixed it all.

Talking of "Jesus", the names in the book are also another myth promoted by the author - he again gives the impression that "God" doesn’t mind what He is called and quite freely whooshes between then depending on his mood. He says God likes the name Elouise - because it means something like "God is real", I think this argument is ridiculous as Yahuweh has a great name already which means a perfect description... He also goes through the whole "yes I’m Jesus, my mum called me Yeshua, some call me Joshua or even Jesse" - this was of course very irritating again, its obvious his Christianity which the book is so supposedly rebelling against is still very strong.

In the whole knowledge of good and evil thing, which I believe was promoted well, he again misses the point of the law - and dismisses it again - which is Christianity shining in... It was also very dream state - I think that a lot of people who are standard relationship based Christians will leave the book disappointed that they have not experienced this "shack" style weekend with God - and want it. Although the author himself says that he has not had an actual meeting like this - it was just a story compiled by his life - I think experience hungry Christians will chase after something like it, and probably end up at Todd Bentley like Florida outpourings. He personifies wisdom... im not too comfortable with that.


So is the book dangerous?


In the wrong hands I believe it is, there is a lot of truth in the book which is used to then cover over lies about the law, names - you know the things that Yah really ranks highly. Its basically a big Christianity relationship based hug, if you are a Christian who believe religion is wrong - you will get a lot from it and it will affirm you... if you are a Christian who is religious it will either make you angry or rethink your position. If you are a non-Christian it will either convert you or leave you vomiting.

In the right hands, he does do a good job of explaining some things - but you really have to pick between the lies sometimes, they are well hidden... its kind of like walking down a really nice country road, you can walk for a good few miles, then suddenly get stung by something, and not even notice because you are so blissfully in awe of the beauty around you. So in that respect, its quite deceptive.

I also hated the way God cooked Mack bacon on 2 occasions – does God contradict himself? According to this book, obviously! Lol

I think Ju and myself have come to the decision that it again covers up the important parts for implementing relationship and trust (Torah) and ends up almost promoting a "free love" style aspect... not like love isn’t free, but its almost like an open relationship...
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Offline sirgodfrey  
#15 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 5:47:00 AM(UTC)
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robski, i feel like i've read the book (which i haven't) just by reading your review. very nice brother.

and to add to what swalchy said about "The Message".... it is utterly, fantastically and ridiculously horrid. after reading some translations within, i was like ........................................................
Offline Bridget  
#16 Posted : Friday, April 3, 2009 1:34:29 PM(UTC)
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Wow, you guys are so tough on this little book.

I'd like for you to write the author of the book and tell him your thoughts. I'd be fascinated to hear his response.

I've talked to quite a few people who have or are now reading this book. Most all of these people I speak of are non-religious...don't spend much time at all thinking about these things......
but this book has opened them to more study.....so, that's a positive!! I think?!!!
Offline kp  
#17 Posted : Friday, April 3, 2009 1:59:06 PM(UTC)
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If The Shack prompts folks toward a relationship with Yahweh, then great. But I think there's a real danger of (some) people getting the wrong impression about the nature of the deity from the book. I guess it can be uplifting IF you're able to grasp the fact that it's totally allegorical. Some people can, some can't. But the fact remains, the plot backs you into the corner of thinking about God as a trinity of three separate divine persons, and that mental picture can hinder your spiritual growth.

kp
Offline Bridget  
#18 Posted : Friday, April 3, 2009 2:40:20 PM(UTC)
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You're absolutely right, kp.
It hindered me, myself.

These concepts sound so easy when you 'get it'....but for years it was all so freakin' difficult for me.

With that in mind....I will, as I hear from people, make these points...and of course, I have sent some here to read YY.

Only a couple. It's hard enough to get people to read a road sign, much less something so deep as YY.

I've also cautioned people from running out and joining their local 'church' for fear the message may get muddled and they lose interest.

But, hey...it's Yahweh's work and ultimately it is their own relation w/ Yahweh.

Perhaps The Shack is inspired....enough to inspire some people. Ya know? I think that's a good thing. I don't fear the danger. I trust the roads, however jagged, that lead to Yah.
I enjoy the awakening inside of them for want of a relationship.

What I DO fear is people like Obama. LOL
Offline bitnet  
#19 Posted : Saturday, April 4, 2009 1:18:27 AM(UTC)
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Shabbat Shalom,

While The Shack may be somewhat of a good read, personally I would not recommend it based on Robski's review. There're too many fairy tales out there already and another book mixing up Truth and fantasy is just going to make things cloudy for the "uninitiated." Misinformation usually starts with a mixture of truth and lies. I've been given other books to read as well, such as Heaven is Real, but it just does not cut it despite the "good" messages contained therein. Just too much misdirection and the poor, gullible people already starved of Truth get served a poisoned meal again. I'd really rather have them read the YY books. Why pay for refined white bread when you can get organic wholemeal?
The reverence of Yahweh is the beginning of Wisdom.
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